What can we reason but from what we know? -Alexander Pope

Opinion


Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 728

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|Jun 20, 2024

    Like burning fuses for the upcoming Fourth of July, our garden delights in the moment are foxtail lilies. Sturdy stalks support tall conical blooms of bright yellow flowers. What most amazes, however, is the way the plant reveals itself. Over the course of 10 days or so, vibrant color explodes from the head, but only in a particularized manner starting at the base of the bloom. The blossoms open sequentially and upward. It is that disciplined but fleeting nature that endears the plants to us....

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|Jun 20, 2024

    My Kingdom For A Horse. I think I remember that a King was suppose to have said this a long time ago, obviously thinking walking wasn’t too great a sport. More recently, just about every horse owner I know has uttered a version of that famous quote. Along about this time of year, rodeo cowboys and cowgirls, whether they’re haulin’ for the big time or making a few weekend rodeos, start to imitate the famous King. Most have spent all winter training on their trusty barrel, team or calf ropin...

  • Financial Focus

    Edward Jones|Jun 20, 2024

    By the time you reach retirement age, you may have accumulated a 401(k), IRA and other investment accounts, along with insurance policies and physical properties. You’ll use some of these assets to support your retirement, but the rest may end up in your estate — which is why an estate plan is so important. So, to leave a legacy for your family and those philanthropic groups you support, you need a comprehensive estate plan — and you need to avoid making mistakes. Here are some of the most common ones: • Procrastinating – Estate planning,...

  • Extension Spotlight

    Scott Stinnett|Jun 20, 2024

    Parasites can have a significant impact on cattle. During summer, flies can directly affect the growth of younger cattle as well as cows nursing calves. Thus, revenues are affected by flies as well due to decreased gains in young cattle and decreased recovery of cows. Controlling flies is relatively easy and has a positive return on the expense. The impact of flies on beef cattle has been studied multiple times over the past 50 years. As fly numbers increase on individual animals, weight gains become reduced compared to animals treated with...

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|Jun 13, 2024

    An oft used small group exercise inquires of participants the characteristics they find most meaningful in church settings, the elements that hold the most meaning for them as a friend or a member of the church. Those present are tasked with winnowing out a hierarchy of responses. As the number of requisites are reduced, people find it near impossible to sit still and come up with a final short list on which everyone can agree. But, as hard as it might appear, most groups are reluctantly able...

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|Jun 13, 2024

    Normally I don’t write about a specific person unless they are dead. There are two reasons for this. One, dead people can’t sue you if they don’t like what you say. Two, I usually write those pieces as tributes to them after their death. A close friend and traveling partner, Fred Roselle and another cowboy I only met a couple of times, Chris Ledoux, were men I wrote about with the deepest respect. Today, I’m going to break my long standing rule and write about a man who is still very much am...

  • Strokes from other Pens

    Senator Byron H and Celeste Pelton|Jun 13, 2024

    We are pleased to write this letter to offer our full support and endorsement of Jerry Sonnenberg for Colorado Congressional District 4. There are several candidates you will see on the primary ballot this June and we would like to share our concerns surrounding other candidates and why we think Jerry Sonnenberg is the clear choice. Representative Mike Lynch is a good legislator and we don’t disagree with him on a lot of issues. What is concerning is that Lynch has been noticeably absent from the rural counties in CD4. CD4 includes over 20 c...

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|Jun 6, 2024

    Sue quite often sends me off to town on an errand. It may be to pick up the mail, take mail to the post office or, as I often suspect, to just get me out of the house. Prior to every trip she issues these directions to me, “Try not to get into too much trouble” Honestly, I hardly ever get into any type of trouble. I do, however, encounter a few “memorable” situations, such as my most recent. This morning she called me into her office to tell me she needed me to go to the store and buy her a lemo...

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|Jun 6, 2024

    It will never be said of me that I am a coffee snob. Is it black, hot, and at least lightly roasted? Good enough. I take some modest degree of pleasure, having waited in line as others’ coffee vocabulary is tested, in simply ordering the core components mentioned above. One would think that at least one or two thank you’s for my promptness would be forthcoming from those remaining in line, but the mental pressure can be acute in laying out coffee particulars. It’s usually best to let them work i...

  • Capital Review

    Mark Hillman|Jun 6, 2024

    Property taxes remain a hot topic in Colorado and rightly so. During COVID, economists expected home values to fall as the economy experienced a sharp recession. So in 2020, the legislature asked voters to eliminate a 40-year-old law that prevented property taxes from rising in unison with the value of that property. Voters agreed. Then something strange happened: the COVID recession was brief and instead of tanking, home prices soared because few homes were offered for sale. Without the 40-year-old Gallagher amendment to limit residential prop...

  • Relentless Gardener

    Linda Langelo|May 30, 2024

    You probably already guessed that cool-season crops benefit the most from partial shade. But why is shade more beneficial to some vegetables than others? There are two reasons. One, shade keeps the leafy vegetables such as kale, lettuce and spinach more tender. With less sunlight, the plants will not grow to the same size as they would with more sun. Naturally, the more sun, the more energy and photosynthesis the plant produces. What is partial shade in terms of hours of sun per day? Partial shade is less than six hours of sun but a minimum of...

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|May 30, 2024

    Ask any gardener this time of year what the signature bloom in their garden is in the moment and you will likely receive praises for the iris family; ruffled, plain, double, domestic, bearded, multi-colored, rustic, mysterious, bright, solitary and altogether amazing! Can one word give them justice? Let’s try ‘fantabulous!’ Each has a pedigree that is noted when purchased, then quickly forgotten in lieu of common designations to our liking, ones tied to family members or friends that gifte...

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|May 23, 2024

    A popular song starts with the works “what a difference a day makes.” It must have been written by someone living in Morgan County! The other day I was excited over light snow falling! Snow makes water and water makes grass, grass makes me and the cows, happy! The previous day was hot and so dry that son David and I discussed whether we should be running our irrigation well on the drying hay field. Luckily, we decided not to. Today, after that very wet snow, the last thing we need is more wat...

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|May 23, 2024

    The artful use of mnemonic devices can assist memory recall through association with related words and phrases. This is especially true for numbers of stories from the Hebrew Bible and New Testament writings from ancient scripture. From an early stage of understanding, and vacation Bible school classes, rose the story of King Nebuchadnezzar and three youth — Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego — who refused to fall into line with the king. As punishment, they were thrown into a fiery furnace (is...

  • Strokes from other Pens

    Lennette Hutt, Legion Auxiliary Unit 137 President|May 23, 2024

    As members of American Legion Auxiliary Unit #137 we hold a special place in our hearts for the parents, siblings, spouses and friends of those who served. We can’t help but think of all the men and women who have gone to fight for this great nation and didn’t return home. While we are all guilty of celebrating the unofficial start of summer and encouraging each other to “have a good weekend,” it is important to remember the reason for the holiday: Memorial Day is the day Americans set aside to honor those brave men and women who met tragic...

  • Relentless Gardener

    Linda Langelo|May 23, 2024

    Homeowners are starting to remove sections of their lawns. The cost of water is rising along with electricity. Grass is the highest maintenance of any crop. There are xeric plants that are low maintenance and need little to no care once they are established. Low shrubs or groundcovers can replace some of the lawn area. Doing this in areas such as along the curb can save you from watering a section that gets extremely hot and dries out faster. Here are some suggestions below: 1) Mock Bearberry manzanita, Arctostaphylos x coloradensis, is hardy...

  • Capital Review

    Mark Hillman|May 23, 2024

    We used to joke that “no man’s life, liberty or property is safe while the legislature is in session.” That’s no laughing matter in today’s Colorado. The collective sigh heard across our state when 100 legislators finally went home to mind their own business reflects the growing sense of dread that accompanies the Colorado General Assembly convening each January. Although some of their worst ideas died on May 8 when the annual session ended, many of them will rise again like zombies next January, and Coloradans will again be subjected...

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|May 16, 2024

    You’ve heard it said of someone who is really good at their job, “They are a natural.” These lucky folks just seem to have been born with all the talent necessary to be successful in their chosen field. Even though they might work at what they do just as hard as others, for these “naturals” things just seem to come out better. Then there are the rest of us. While some seem to be born with the proverbial silver spoon in their mouth, talent-wise, there are those of us whose spoon was plastic....

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|May 16, 2024

    On the isolated plains of Eastern Colorado are found homestead windbreaks, shelterbelts that protect property in high winds, reduce erosion, and drop snow in the form of moisture granting drifts. Two inches of wind-driven snow can do wonders for the soil profile inside a windbreak. Wildlife also depends on the windbreaks to support links in the food chain including rabbits, kangaroo rats, gophers, snakes, owls and other raptors such as the red-tailed hawks and an occasional brown or bald eagle....

  • Trooper Tips

    Patrick Rice, Sergeant|May 16, 2024

    As we move towards the spring weather, still being hounded with snow … It’s that time of year when Coloradoans are reminded that we live in an extraordinary state, with extraordinary weather and the need for proper equipment and precautions never goes away. We all have budgets and wish to be fiscally responsible. I see long lines at the tire shops nearing the end of April and moving into May as people are quick to remove those snow tires and save the tread for next season. While I like this idea and support the decision to use quality tir...

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|May 9, 2024

    I am constantly amazed by animals. Their superior intelligence is a constant wonder to me. I keep trying to figure out just where we humans went wrong. We probably started out as smart as other creatures. Somewhere along the way our group began to fall behind. Recently I made a startling discovery that reminded me of this. The day began like most late spring, early summer days. I awoke about daylight, consumed enough coffee to get my heart pumping, pulled on my boots and headed outdoors. After...

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|May 9, 2024

    The first three books of the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) are known as the Synoptic gospels. They are broadly related and represent a unified historical approach for many. Similar theological themes connect them in forming a floor for scriptural understanding. The life and times of Jesus are laid out, to the extent we know them and the narratives and parallels between the three gospels are reassuring to hang our hats on. As a collection, they could easily have been titled, “New T...

  • Relentless Gardner

    Linda Langelo|May 9, 2024

    You probably already guessed that cool-season crops benefit the most from partial shade. But why is shade more beneficial to some vegetables than others? There are two reasons. One, shade keeps the the leafy vegetables such as kale, lettuce, and spinach more tender. With less sunlight, the plants will not grow to the same size as they would with more sun. Naturally, the more sun, the more energy and photosynthesis the plant produces. What is partial shade in terms of hours of sun per day? Partial shade is less than six hours of sun but a...

  • Fearless Faith

    Ken Frantz|May 2, 2024

    Spirituality and numbers make for uneasy companions when it comes to relative importance in the life of the church. Most people disavow a dependency on numbers as a reflection of how well a church is doing. Deep down they know better, but neither will any church turn away numbers of people if they appear at the doorsteps of the church. To say a church is accomplishing all it can as justified by head counts, is an afront to the Word. In years of participation in church, I have encountered...

  • Under the Wire

    Gary Hodgson|May 2, 2024

    If today’s title seems a bit indecisive, trust me, you got it right! The seasons have been a little hard to identify here on the Hodgson Ranch. The year, like everyone else’s began with January, followed by February, both supposed to be identified by cold days. We had 50 to 70 degree days instead. Guess we just got our months mixed up. Next came March, usually the spring door opener. This year it featured a mixture of some freezing nights and 70 degree days. Must not be spring after all, I tho...

Page Down

Rendered 06/24/2024 17:54